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  • Writer's pictureRaghad Bushnaq

The Recitations of The Quran


Allah says: "Move not your tongue with it, [O Muhammad], to hasten with recitation of the Qur'an. Indeed, upon Us is its collection [in your heart] and [to make possible] its recitation. So when We have recited it [through Gabriel], then follow its recitation. Then upon Us is its clarification to you." Al-Qiyamah, Verse 16,


The Quran is the speech of Allah, taken by Jibreel from Allah and recited to Muhammad (peace be upon him), who listened to it from Jibreel. He took it from him just as Allah spoke it. Allah preserved it in the heart of Muhammad (peace be upon him)


Allah says: "Say, [O Muhammad], "The Holy Spirit has brought it down from your Lord in truth to make firm those who believe and as guidance and good tidings to the Muslims." (Surah An-Nahl, verse 102)


There are several different recitations of the Quran, each with its own unique style and pronunciation. These recitations are known as qira'at, and they have been passed down from generation to generation through a meticulous tradition. These recitations are not different versions of the Quran, but rather different ways of reciting the same text. The recitation of the Quran is considered a form of worship, and the act of reciting the Quran brings blessings and rewards.


The people of the various qira'at (recitations) have confirmed that they are all transmitted from Allah. Therefore, you will find their chains of transmission in both the East and the West mentioning at the end of the chain that it is from Jibreel from Allah. This is clear evidence that all the recitations were spoken by Allah.


There are seven main Qira'at, which are all considered to be equally valid which were transmitted by seven of the Prophet Muhammad's companions.


The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) said: "The Quran was revealed in seven different ahruf (dialects), so recite of it that which seems easiest to you." (Sahih al-Bukhari) This Hadith indicates that the Quran was revealed in multiple qira'at, and that Muslims may choose to recite in the qira'ah that they find easiest. Narrated by Abu Hurairah.


These recitations are:

1. Naafi' al-Madani

2. Ibn Kathir al-Makki

3. Abu Amr ibn al-Ala'

4. Ibn Amir ad-Dimashqi

5. Asim al-Kufi

6. Hamzah al-Kufi

7. Al-Kisai

In addition to these seven, there are three more recitations that are less well-known.

These recitations are:

8. Abu Ja'far al-Madani

9. Ya'qub al-Hadrami

10. Khalaf ibn Hisham


There are different opinions among scholars regarding the relationship between the seven ahruf, and the ten qira'at. Some scholars believe that the ten qira'at are simply different ways of reciting the same seven ahruf, while others argue that the ten qira'at represent a broader range of variations in the Quranic text that were allowed within the seven ahruf.

According to this latter view, the seven ahruf refer to differences in pronunciation and grammar, while the ten qira'at encompass a wider range of differences, including variations in word order and vocabulary. In other words, the seven ahruf refer to variations in how the Quran was recited, while the ten qira'at refer to variations in the written text of the Quran.

Some scholars also argue that the additional three qira'at were developed later as a way of preserving and standardizing the various recitations of the Quran that were in use at the time. Whatever the case may be, it is clear that the ten qira'at have played an important role in the history of the Quran's transmission and preservation and continue to be studied and recited by Muslims around the world.


The different recitations of the Quran may differ in their pronunciation, including the lengthening or shortening of vowels, and the ordering of certain letters, which can affect the meaning of the text. This is because the Arabic language has a rich system of diacritical marks that can change the meaning of a word based on how it is pronounced.


For example, in Surah Al-Hajj, verse 25 (22:25):


Hafs Recitation:

"إِنَّ الَّذِينَ كَفَرُوا وَيَصُدُّونَ عَن سَبِيلِ اللَّهِ وَالْمَسْجِدِ الْحَرَامِ الَّذِي جَعَلْنَاهُ لِلنَّاسِ سَوَاءً الْعَاكِفُ فِيهِ وَالْبَادِ وَمَن يُرِدْ فِيهِ بِإِلْحَادٍ بِظُلْمٍ نُّذِقْهُ مِنْ عَذَابٍ بَئِيسٍ"


Shu’ba Recitation:

"إِنَّ الَّذِينَ كَفَرُوا وَيَصُدُّونَ عَن سَبِيلِ اللَّهِ وَالْمَسْجِدِ الْحَرَامِ الَّذِي جَعَلْنَاهُ لِلنَّاسِ سَوَاءً الْعَاكِفُ فِيهِ وَالْبَادِ وَمَن يُرِدْ فِيهِ بِإِلْحَادٍ بِظُلْمٍ نُّذِقْهُ مِنْ عَذَابٍ بَيئسٍ"


"Indeed, those who disbelieve and avert [people] from the way of Allah and [from] al-Masjid al-Haram, which We made for the people - equal are the resident therein and one from outside; and [also] whoever intends [a deed] therein of deviation [in religion] or wrongdoing - We will make him taste of a painful punishment."


In the Hafs recitation, the last word of the verse is spelled as "بَئِيسٍ" (ba'īsin), whereas in the Shu'ba recitation, the last word is spelled as "بَيْئَسٍ" (bi’asin) switching the hamza after ya’.

This is a minor difference in the way the Quran is recited, and both readings are considered valid and acceptable.


The different recitations of the Quran originated from the diverse linguistic backgrounds of the early Muslim community. The Prophet Muhammad himself was reported to have recited the Quran in different ways based on the dialects and accents of the people he was addressing. As the Muslim community spread across different regions, the recitations of the Quran also evolved and adapted to local dialects and accents.


Together, these ten recitations are collectively known as the "qiraat ashara" or the "ten recitations."

The reason why these ten recitations are famous is due to the great importance that Muslims place on the accurate and authentic recitation of the Quran. The Prophet Muhammad himself recited the Quran in different ways at different times, and he encouraged his companions to recite it in different ways as well. Over time, these different recitations became standardized and were transmitted through a meticulous oral tradition.




Exploring The Ten Different Recitations of The Holy Quran: History, Importance, And Differences


1. Hafs An Asim: This recitation is the most widely used and accepted recitation of the Quran. It is named after two prominent figures in the history of Quranic recitation, Hafs ibn Sulaiman and Asim ibn Abi al-Najud. This recitation is known for its clarity and ease of pronunciation.


2. Warsh An Nafi: This recitation is named after Nafi' al-Madani, who was a prominent scholar of Quranic recitation. It is primarily used in North Africa and is known for its distinct pronunciation and melody.


3. Qaloon An Nafi: This recitation is also named after Nafi' al-Madani and is commonly used in West Africa. It is known for its clear and precise pronunciation.


4. Ad-Duri An Abu Amr: This recitation is named after Abu Amr al-Dani, who was a prominent scholar of Quranic recitation. It is known for its melodious and rhythmic style.


5. Khalaf An Hamzah: This recitation is named after Hamzah al-Kufi, who was a prominent scholar of Quranic recitation. It is known for its unique style and melody.


6. Khallad An Hamzah: This recitation is named after Hamzah al-Kufi's student, Khalaf. It is known for its unique style and is primarily used in North Africa.


7. Al-Buzzi An Ibn Kathir: This recitation is named after Ibn Kathir, a prominent scholar of Quranic exegesis. It is known for its clear and precise pronunciation and is commonly used in Syria and parts of the Levant.


8. Qunbul An Ibn Amir: This recitation is named after Ibn Amir al-Shami, a prominent scholar of Quranic recitation. It is known for its unique pronunciation and is primarily used in Yemen.


9. Abu Jafar An Ibn Wardan: This recitation is named after Ibn Wardan, a student of Abu Jafar. It is known for its clear and precise pronunciation and is commonly used in Iraq and parts of the Arabian Peninsula.


10. Yaqub An Nafi': This recitation is named after Nafi' al-Madani's student, Yaqub. It is known for its unique pronunciation and is primarily used in Sudan and parts of East Africa.


It's important to note that the differences between these recitations are mainly in pronunciation, intonation, and the length of vowels. The actual text of the Quran remains the same in all recitations, and they all convey the same message.

Additionally, there are various schools of recitation within each of these recitations, which reflect the different ways that the Quran was passed down through the generations. These schools of recitation have different methods of pronunciation and recitation, but they are all considered valid and acceptable ways of reciting the Quran.


It is also important to note that while each Qira'at has its own unique style and pronunciation, they all follow the same basic rules of Tajwid (the rules of Quranic recitation) and do not differ in their meaning but may take the meaning to another level of understanding. The recitation of the Quran is a form of worship and is greatly valued in Islamic culture. Muslims around the world strive to perfect their recitation and study the various Qira'at to better understand and appreciate the beauty and depth of the Quran.


Overall, the recitation of the Quran is an integral part of Islamic worship and is a means of connecting with Allah and seeking His blessings and guidance. Muslims strive to recite the Quran with proper pronunciation and intonation, and many devote significant time and effort to memorizing and perfecting their recitation.











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